Selling the thwink method

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Robert Gowans
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Selling the thwink method

Postby Robert Gowans » Thu Aug 30, 2007 3:48 pm

Here's the first draft of my "selling the thwink method" paper. It's at an early stage, but I wanted to get it out there for discussion.

http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dgxb6ggz_59jtt7r

As requested I started a new topic, however the following responses are from this earlier topic:

http://thwink.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=95

Jack,

With regards to one-to-one marketing vs mass marketing - I think you're spot on, one-to-one is certainly superior. In fact, step two of the process the "vision development video" is based on a "9 block vision processing model" in Solution Selling that would be typically be a one-to-one process.

I kind of envisioned the three step process acting as both a megaphone to virally spread the message and a funnel where the people who share the vision end up at step 3 with some actions they could take. Perhaps one action could be to arrange a one-to-one call, or join a conference call or webcast where questions could be asked?

Michael,

Thanks for the video links. I think youtube has a lot of potential. In relation to step one of the process, what if our opening hooks were to post individual video responses on youtube to all the videos you listed?

Let me know what you think and I'm happy to better explain things that I haven't explained very well.

Best Regards,

Rob

Jack Harich
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Postby Jack Harich » Thu Aug 30, 2007 6:08 pm

Rob,

Looks very productive. What I found most useful is the model of human behavior the method is based on. It has incremental instead of big steps. The key is to make each step easy and appealing to take, and to fit the target audience where the action chain begins.

Here’s my understanding/summary of the action chain steps:
    0. A person has a problem and no solution.

    1. They see a possible solution, via an opening hook.

    2. The understand enough of the possible solution to want to study it, via a solution vision development item. This could be a video, a web page, or a video on a related web page. Videos are preferred to no videos.

    3. They study it and become convinced it’s worth trying, via an in-depth document (long page, paper or book) or full length video, and possibly related items.

    4. They try the solution, via personal action. Or they engage in conversation with Thwink, etc, as the first step of action.

But your write up is much more fine grained and organized into a check off production process.

I’ll start a new thread on the target market, this is so crucial.

I realize there is more to come in your proposal. Eventually an implementation plan will appear. If we work smart, as we are already doing thanks to you, :-) all this is not going to take a lot of work, for a potentially big payoff.

On the opening hooks, that’s something I’m not good at. Maybe you and Michael can do this. I think way too much like an engineer.

On the vision development videos, the story boarding and scripting is something you should leave me out of. On short videos and web pages, I tend to over explain and pack in too much, and do not address people’s social and confidence needs well. Again, you and Michael are probably 10x better on this.

On creating a video from a story board and script, I may be able to help. You can evaluate my skills and techniques from current videos. Note the lack of any digital movie camera work. I’ll be glad to learn new tricks. Or we can consider professionals or contacts.

On the action pages, I think the strategy and perhaps the outline of each page should come from marketing, so it fits the action chain. But I can probably flesh in some pages. We may also have existing pages that just need tweaking.

On actually getting started:

1. Let me know exactly what to add to all Thwink pages to handle Google Analytics. I assume you can handle the actual use of the data on Google. Hopefully we can leave the Stuffed Tracker code in. That’s useful for me, and last time I checked had features Google Analytics lacks. I can give you the userid and password to Stuffed Tracker so you can examine its data, if useful.

2. Can we pilot a single action step chain to test/refine our production process and assumptions? This would be a single action page, a single video, and a small number of opening hooks.

Thanks so much,

Jack

Robert Gowans
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Postby Robert Gowans » Sun Sep 02, 2007 3:37 pm

Jack,

I've rewritten the paper somewhat with the aim of reducing "pain" jargon. I also attempted to make the three step process more generic so that it includes channels other than the Internet - for example, step 2 no longer has to be a video, it could be a paper or a one to one discussion.

I liked your term "Action Chains" so that's what the three step process is called now.

http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dgxb6ggz_59jtt7r

1. Let me know exactly what to add to all Thwink pages to handle Google Analytics. I assume you can handle the actual use of the data on Google. Hopefully we can leave the Stuffed Tracker code in. That’s useful for me, and last time I checked had features Google Analytics lacks. I can give you the userid and password to Stuffed Tracker so you can examine its data, if useful.


If you give me the userid/password to ST I'll check it out - it might very well be good enough for our needs.

2. Can we pilot a single action step chain to test/refine our production process and assumptions? This would be a single action page, a single video, and a small number of opening hooks.


Yes, if we think the three step process has promise, then a reasonable next step would be a pilot test. I'll take a closer look at your target market post and reply so that we can work towards building a pilot action chain for a high priority target market.

Regards,

Rob

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Postby Jack Harich » Sun Sep 02, 2007 7:15 pm

Regarding: “I've rewritten the paper somewhat with the aim of reducing "pain" jargon.” – Good. The pain terminology ignored the fact that people seek change for two basic reasons: to decrease pain or increase pleasure. They are not the same, which the earlier terminology implied. This is related to the fact that positive reinforcement causes subjects to behave very differently from negative reinforcement or pain removal.

Re: “I also attempted to make the three step process more generic so that it includes channels other than the Internet - for example, step 2 no longer has to be a video, it could be a paper or a one to one discussion.” – Good.

I’ve sent you what you need for using Stuffed Tracker via email.

On a pilot test, we could start by using a simple example in the Action Chain write up. We could even use this is a chance to document the chain starting in the Wikipedia Sustainability entry.

The history of that chain is interesting. In early 2006 the site was up but getting about 5 visitors a day and no contacts. Experimentation with placing feeders led to 5 to 10 a day, but still no contacts. Then I thought of trying Wikipedia. I studied the Sustainability entry and others for a day to learn the writing style, which is “neutral point of view.” Then I spent another day writing up two paragraphs, in a new section titled “The Phenomenon of Change Resistance.” Then I made the change. Later I added a change to the entry on Memetics.

The results were fantastic. About 3 to 5 visitors from the Sustainability entry came to the Thwink.org site. They tended to stay for an amazing average of 5 to 10 minutes, which is long in internet time. 1 or 2 a day even downloaded the Dueling Loops paper. Soon I started getting 1 to 2 email contacts a month. About half were very high quality. These were impressive results.

Experimentation showed that the link from the Sustainability entry fared poorly if it went to the Thwink home page, no matter what was on it. Much better was to go to a new page I created on The Phenomenon of Change Resistance. That page had a link to the Dueling Loops paper at the bottom.

Sad to say, things deteriorated when someone “improved” the change resistance section in the Wikipedia Sustainability entry. First, they changed the name of the section to “Barriers to sustainability.” Then they added a bunch of info that, in my opinion, was lower quality and a reader turnoff. This included mixing in a dash of Marxism. Needless to say, visitors fell off by about 80%.

Fortunately someone else (?) patched the entry up, restored the key paragraph about Thwink, restored the subtitle of “The phenomenon of change resistance,” and moved the low quality stuff to the bottom. Number of visitors increased back to 50% of before. But guess what? The number of contacts and quality of visitors remained very low. It appears that the change resistance section is now too big and confusing to attract a certain type of clear headed, analytical thinker who is looking for a better way. They conclude they are not going to find it there.

I have not tried to edit the entry after my original change, because I think there would be resistance. Worse yet, the material at Thwink is what Wikipedians call “original research” that has never been supported by peer review. I created a new entry on Change Resistance. It was deleted, because there is no peer review literature supported my claim that change resistance is a real phenomenon. :-) I fear the same could happen if I edit the Sustainablity entry in an attempt to restore the quality of the original entry.

George Turned says that the biggest thing I could do to publicize the site is to somehow restore the quality of the original entry. Hmmm….

Isn’t history fascinating?

Jack

Robert Gowans
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Postby Robert Gowans » Mon Sep 03, 2007 4:20 pm

Jack,

I think it might be useful to nail down what the objectives are with the "sales" project. At the moment I have (in order of priority):

1. Advocate the adoption of the thwink approach by an organization.

2. Encourage personal action to explore and promote the thwink approach

3. Engage people in a dialogue about the thwink approach

4. Raise general awareness of the thwink approach to solving the sustainability problem.

What are your thoughts regarding our objectives? Does this look about right, are we missing anything?

In particular, I'm wondering if "establishing proof" should be worked in as an objective, or whether that discussion should be taken seperately?

Rob

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Postby Jack Harich » Mon Sep 03, 2007 7:02 pm

Rob,

Now that’s the right question: What are our objectives?

We’re past the analysis stage. The new paradigm has been created. Now we seem to need to move on to the “proof of concept” stage.

I had hoped that by now, several people or organizations would have done this, but apparently either paradigm change resistance is stronger than I anticipated, or the fundamental concepts are unsound. In particular, hardly anyone has run the First Experiment. You might wonder why I haven’t run it. Well, I have on a few friends. But I have no connections to organizations, because I’m new to activism. And due to a health problem, I work at home and seldom go anywhere, so it’s hard for me to play the role of salesman. See this link.

Just last week I concluded that proof of concept is the next needed step. I had a 90 minute call with Glenn McMillian of Australia last Friday. We’d like to get a real world mini-project going that proves some essential component true. But it looks like I’d have to do the analysis and an existing organization would have to implement the mini solution element. This could be any number of solution areas. Another option is running social experiments. Glen and I will see what’s possible.

I’m going to start to meet with George Turner for dinner every Friday to pursue an analysis of the local school system. George is sharp, the founder of two successful businesses. In retirement he decided to take up teaching high school chemistry and physics. He has noticed what many others have—the American school system is broken. It’s suffering from all sorts of problems and things are getting worse.

The solutions tried are intuitive and usually do not work. Some, just like in the urban decay crisis, make the problem worse. George is in the ideal position to play the same role the major of Boston played in solving the urban decay crisis: the domain expert. I can play the role of Forrester, the analyst. The problem appears to be simpler than the Global Environmental Sustainability Problem, due to the way the entire biosphere or civilized world is not involved. There also appears to be a constituency that is highly motivated to implement a promising solution: parents.

So you have put your finger on the same strategic need as I have, “establishing proof.” We basically want to get people and organizations to take action that will lead to that. Currently the easiest way to do this is run the First Experiment. Probably the second easiest way is to design additional experiments and run them. This is exactly what business and science does. Once we have some experimental results, that will point to where we need to put our next efforts. This will be back to analysis if key hypothesis are proved to be false, or on to some serious solution convergence if they are proved true. Or it may be a combination, due to mixed results.

I like your list of the 4 action objectives. Can you redo it with the above paragraph in mind? And perhaps this message will give you some more ideas.

As the full length video project rolls along, at one point the film will present the audience with what you can do. This will cover many types of people and orgs. I plan to present many tangible things they can do in a cohesive way, similar to the last chapter in the AA book, which is titled “What Can I Do Tomorrow Morning?” This will allow me to think through all this in detail.

Jack

Robert Gowans
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Postby Robert Gowans » Tue Sep 04, 2007 2:18 pm

Jack,

So you have put your finger on the same strategic need as I have, “establishing proof.” We basically want to get people and organizations to take action that will lead to that. Currently the easiest way to do this is run the First Experiment. Probably the second easiest way is to design additional experiments and run them.


A suggestion: how about we investigate the feasibility of conducting experiments online. This could provide us with a breakthrough in terms of:

- providing an easy way for people to do the experiments
- hugely increasing experimental participation
- simplifying and speeding the deployment of new experiments and testing of hypotheses

For example, online action chains could include participation in an online experiment as an action item.

Also, if all our online action chains are well designed there is a good chance the person may give us permission to send them regular email updates - which would include new experiments to participate in.

So, to expand the vision a little - what if we had 50,000 email subscribers? We could publish a new experiment, send an email update and then thousands may try the experiment within a day or two - that's a fast way of testing hypotheses. A step towards virtual solution factories perhaps?

Rob[/quote]

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Postby Jack Harich » Tue Sep 04, 2007 5:43 pm

It's a fantastic idea, but there is a catch. Randomized controlled experiments are the gold standard of experiments. But they require a random sample of the population that you wish to draw conclusions about. We are not going to get that from visitors to the site. For example, a church group or a college class is probably much less biased that visitors to the Thwink site, because the site attracts such an infinitesimal, highly filtered portion of the population.

The way random samples of people are done is first a list of people is selected, using an unbiased method, from the entire population. Then they are contacted individually or as a group, to run the experiment. This is often a questionnaire, which is what the First Experiment is. This is the easiest type to run.

Many websites have tried what you suggest. The good ones caution the results are biased. But maybe there is a way to use the internet to do a large unbiased sample at low cost.

However, even if the sample is biased, we can randomly assign people to different treatments. That could possibly yield valid results. But I'm also a bit concerned that our basic sample would be so biased that the results would be unsound.

Philip had this problem when he ran the First Experiment on a group in Australia. The group included people who could figure out what the experiment was probably trying to do, due to their occupations, such as sociologists and experimenters. There was also a strong cultural misfit, because the handout used American language and references, but this was an Australian audience. The result was the group that was exposed to the brief Truth Test training was fooled MORE than the group that had no training.

But there are ways around these problems. We've just got to figure out ones that work for us.

Thanks,

Jack

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Facebook as an experimentation platform

Postby Robert Gowans » Mon Sep 10, 2007 5:01 am

Jack,

I can see that the random requirement does not fit experimentation via the thwink website, as there will be an extreme bias towards people already interested in finding a new solution to the sustainability problem.

However, how about using a social platform such as Facebook who have an open api. We could build an experimentation application using the Facebook api. Our thwink subscribers could then assist in seeding the experiments to their friends on facebook - the viral nature of facebook may ensure that we get a broad base of particpants. Some other benefits of facebook are: we may be able to capture demographic information on participants; we should be able to limit each facebook user to one attempt at any particular experiment; because facebook is a closed system based on social connections, it may be easier to make it difficult for people to "game" the experiments.

This could be one of the first "serious" ways to leverage Facebook. Of course, developing this kind of application takes time and resources.

What do you think?

Rob

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Postby Jack Harich » Mon Sep 10, 2007 4:56 pm

Rob,

Sounds like a good idea to try. We don’t need a perfectly unbiased sample. We just need one that’s not overly biased. If we see promising experimental results in Facebook folks, that will probably transfer to the rest of the population, with hopefully small differences.

A huge bonus is such viral experimentation could also spread the new paradigm. To me that’s the most brilliant part of your suggestion.

I’m unfamiliar with Facebook. What is their “open api”? I guess you are thinking ahead to dynamic web pages where a person can take the entire questionnaire online. I haven’t done any web development like this. But if you could get me going, I’m sure I could pick it up. I have Dreamweaver, and used to be proficient in VB and then Java.

Overall I think it’s a great idea. Are there any examples out there of others who have tried something similar?

Jack

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Postby Robert Gowans » Tue Sep 11, 2007 5:08 am

Jack,

You can read more about the facebook platform here:

http://developers.facebook.com/

There is a directory of existing applications here:

http://www.facebook.com/apps/

And here is a questionnaire style application My Personality:

http://www.facebook.com/apps/applicatio ... 2490151219

The official client libraries are here:

http://developers.facebook.com/resources.php

The supported libraries are PHP and Java. I don't know who your web host is, but it is more likely they support PHP than Java. In addition, Java might be a little heavy for such an application. We'd also need a database to store results etc. MySQL is provided with most web hosting packages and is a good combination with PHP.

Note: I have a good web host with PHP support and unlimited MySQL databases for testing purposes if that helps.

I think step one might be to contact the author of the My Personality application and see if he could help us out by sharing some design/code examples.

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Postby Jack Harich » Tue Sep 11, 2007 8:14 am

Rob,

Thanks for putting this potential project together. It looks like something I could do, but it would be working at a very low level. It would take a long time to develop and then perfect the application. Only after that would we know if it was beneficial or not. We would apparently be pioneers here.

Weighing this project versus others for investment versus payoff, I think the film series is a better place to put my time right now. Another project is an analysis of why school systems are behaving poorly. Another is a fellow who wants to start a liberal think tank and meet with me. Another is designing more (and better) experiments, in anticipation of those wanting to run them. Another is a fellow who wants to arrange a grant for my work and get it into high gear. Etc. So it would be best if I backed off from being the developer on this project, and we tried to find another one.

Returning to the central strategy of this thread, there are other ways to get people interested in the Thwink ideas. Why don’t we keep things simple for awhile, and get back to setting up simple action chains like you suggested? We can try to get some base hits before swinging for a home run.

Jack

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Postby Robert Gowans » Tue Sep 11, 2007 11:33 am

So it would be best if I backed off from being the developer on this project, and we tried to find another one.


No problem - I'll take a look at it myself.

Returning to the central strategy of this thread, there are other ways to get people interested in the Thwink ideas. Why don’t we keep things simple for awhile, and get back to setting up simple action chains like you suggested? We can try to get some base hits before swinging for a home run.


Couldn't agree more. I've updated the analysis paper with regards to objectives and target markets and I think it's good enough for now. The next step in the process is to plan a campaign. Guided by the analysis paper we need to narrow down the who, what, where, how. I'll chew this over for a bit.

Rob

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Postby Jack Harich » Tue Sep 11, 2007 12:23 pm

Rob,

Good start, but let’s tighten up the objectives. Plus, strategy is not the same as the generic process that all good managers follow.

The top objective seems to be to get some of the key components of the Thwink paradigm adopted by existing organizations.

The top strategy to achieve that is something like promoting the existing material at the Thwink.org website, by the use of methods that Jack has not tried, but Rob has expertise in. This strategy leads directly to the project we’re working on: Selling the Thwink Method.

Now then, we can get down to the 5 objectives you listed. We can see these as lower level objectives, whose accomplishment leads to the top objective mentioned above. The organization of these low level objectives will relate to the strategy used in the marketing project/campaign. Presently the 5 objectives are:
1. Advocate the adoption of the thwink approach by an organization
2. Increase participation in thwink experiments
3. Encourage personal action to promote the thwink approach
4. Engage people in a continuing dialogue about the thwink approach
5. Raise general awareness of the thwink approach to solving the sustainability problem.


I expect as you work on the details of the campaign, these will tighten up. They are more like an incomplete list of mental steps we want people to go through. But they are not in an optimum sequence. So I’d just consider then as working notes, until your plan fleshes out.

One possibility is a hierarchy(s) of personal decisions. As visitors read the items on the action chain, and particularly what’s at the end of each chain, they accept certain new facts as true and come to new conclusions. Once they’ve accepted a certain percentage or portion of a hierarchy, the emergent results is the conclusion at the top.

You might be able to plan at least two hierarchies. One would be for influencers. The node at the top is they are convinced the Thwink paradigm, or some portion of it, is worth telling someone else about, preferably someone higher up. The other would be for decision makers. The top node is to implement one or more of the Thwink concepts. Below that might be the decision to run an experiment. If successful or illuminating, that leads the decision maker to the top node.

Near the bottom of the hierarchies are nodes like “This looks promising. I think I’ll go check out Thwink.” These are the beginning of your action chains.

Have I explained myself well? Does this make sense?

Thanks once again,

Jack

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Postby Robert Gowans » Tue Sep 11, 2007 3:09 pm

Jack,

I think the paper was suffering from a lack of focus. I wasn't sure whether I was trying to develop a full marketing/sales process for thwink (outside of my skill set/experience really), or concentrating on a project to achieve the top objective "by the use of methods that Jack has not tried, but Rob has expertise in". My understanding now is that the focus is really on the later.

Defining the ultimate top objective is a good start...

The top objective seems to be to get some of the key components of the Thwink paradigm adopted by existing organizations.


...however, is there a parallel top objective to gain sponsorship or funding for an independent thwink project? In particular I'm thinking of the Diagnostic Project.

A couple more comments:

The top strategy to achieve that is something like promoting the existing material at the Thwink.org website.


I think we may need to alter/re-purpose existing material or develop new material to better targeted specific markets and action chains - that would be identified in the planning phase.

Now then, we can get down to the 5 objectives you listed. We can see these as lower level objectives, whose accomplishment leads to the top objective mentioned above. The organization of these low level objectives will relate to the strategy used in the marketing project/campaign.


Right, the lower level objectives will be closely tied to specific action chains, so I've removed the prioritized list.

I've tightened up the paper - and it feels more like a project I can move forward with.

Any comments?

Rob

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Postby Jack Harich » Tue Sep 11, 2007 3:45 pm

Regarding: “...however, is there a parallel top objective to gain sponsorship or funding for an independent thwink project? In particular I'm thinking of the Diagnostic Project.”

Good point. How about: “The top objective is to get some of the key components of the Thwink paradigm implemented. This is primarily expected to be by existing organizations. But this may also include new ones or small targeted projects, such as the Diagnostic Project.”

Yes, we will need to improve existing material to better fit the campaign, or produce new material.

Now let me take a peek at the paper:

Try no yellow, just bold, and left justified for the point of emphasis. We don’t want the usability police coming our way. ;-)

Very nice concise summary of deliverables per step.

Verticals looks good. However, the matrix is not clear. How about a table identifying the columns and row types?

I’d say something about a small pilot somewhere, so we can approach this iteratively and make our big mistakes up front. The pilot will allow us to refine our analysis and plan for a larger pilot, and a still larger one, until we feel comfortable about a full scale campaign.

A sample action chain to illustrate the concept would help. It could go just before “Step 1. Raise awareness.” It might take only one paragraph to describe. You know this stuff, but I (and others) don’t.

I really think this is going to be productive, because we are following our own advice. We are taking the time to do an analysis, and we have a process.

Muchos gracias,

Jack

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Postby Robert Gowans » Wed Sep 19, 2007 2:59 pm

Jack,

I've updated the paper some more, including more information on the process and an example of action chains:

http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dgxb6ggz_59jtt7r

I've also updated the Target Market Analysis and split it off into a new document, as I feel this comes under the analysis phase (as will other analysis documents such as a site analysis, search analysis - prior to any recommendations):

http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dgxb6ggz_12ck64f8

Any comments?

Rob

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Postby Jack Harich » Wed Sep 19, 2007 3:33 pm

Hi Rob,

Both documents look plenty mature enough to start, from my viewpoint. But I don't have the marketing expertise and experience you have, so when they are ready and when we should start is up to you.


On the Selling the Thwink Message document, with the process and action chains:

I really like the way I can read through the process steps and visualize the mental steps a person will take to go through an action chain. The diagram example really helps. But I suspect your analysis will show we need to create or revise so as to have actions that fit business managers more closely. Also, I suspect the actions will have a hierarchy. First you do a little one, and then a bigger one, etc.

It's great to see, in the example, how creating just the right Vision Development component can make such a big difference. This is a really beautiful and powerful part of your approach. Thanks!



On the Thwink Target Market Analysis document, with the market segments and target market matrix:

Great. About "The organizational assessment in the Analytical Activism book showed there are only two organizations who fit this criteria." - This is all I found. There are probably more. My feeling is they are going to be a very small percentage, less than 5% would be my estimate.

What does the word matrix mean? Seems mostly one dimensional. The table seems more like our top priority target markets, ranked by priority.

Powerful table. The priorities is very interesting. Can't remember what I said before, but I would move Environmental NGO to the bottom. I think all the other will be more responsive to our message.


A bit of news:

Martha and I went to a Democrats of Forsyth County rally last night. I've never been to one of these. What an education! I noticed the people were agreeable and intellegent, but on political matters, they were thinking at such a superficial level. They are making voting decisions based on the flimsiest of reasons. Overall, whichever candidate or party has the most emotional appeal, that's who they go with. Actual facts play a minor role.

We arrived 2 hours early to help setup. There were plenty of helpers, so we mostly chatted about guess what, politics. I found myself in new waters, unable to get what I felt was a substantial conversation going with anyone.

I had printed up a short statement called the Progressive Paradox on cards, 5 1/2" by 8 1/2". Someone liked them so much they placed them on the centerpiece on each table. So during the meal and speeches, everyone read the cards.

After the speeches, especially the last, people were fired up. But I still couldn't get a decent, productive conversation going. There were about 90 people. We stayed until the end, helping to clean up and put the tables and chairs back in storage. When things got down to 10 people, I tried a new tactic. I approached the chair of the Democratic Party of Forsyth County, showed her one of the cards about the Progressive Paradox, and asked "What did you think of this?"

That opened her up a little. She thought it was right on target and very interesting. Then I pulled out a 112 minute video on the subject and said, "Take a look at this. It all about how to solve the paradox. I just finished it last week." Well, she lit up like a firecracker! We had a good conversation. She's definitely going to watch the video.

Then I tried the same thing on a politician running for state senator. It worked even better. He asked penetrating questions, and I had good answers. I led the conversation to what comes after the video: the Dueling Loops book. He picked up the book, and got even more interested. He of course was pretty sharp, with a Phd in Ecology, and has a campaign staff in gear already.

Apparently I've stumbled on a way to get folks to open up to a new way of thwinking....

Jack

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Postby Robert Gowans » Wed Sep 19, 2007 4:12 pm

It's great to see, in the example, how creating just the right Vision Development component can make such a big difference.


Yes, what happens following the initial vision development aid is critical - it's a real win/lose moment. If we can make the vision development aid really speak to the person in their language and develop on some level a shared vision of how we might be able solve the problem - we'll have an opportunity to engage with that person.

Also, I suspect the actions will have a hierarchy. First you do a little one, and then a bigger one, etc.


Exactly, one first action might be for the person to give us permission to send an email newsletters - that way we can help develop their understanding of thwink over time, deepen engagement and gradually encourage more actions which require more commitment.

What does the word matrix mean? Seems mostly one dimensional. The table seems more like our top priority target markets, ranked by priority.


Matrix? Just trying to jazz things up a bit. :-) I've removed that.

Powerful table. The priorities is very interesting. Can't remember what I said before, but I would move Environmental NGO to the bottom. I think all the other will be more responsive to our message.


I've moved them down.

Apparently I've stumbled on a way to get folks to open up to a new way of thwinking....


Very interesting.

So your leader was the card plus "what do you think of this?". Your vision development was the subsequent conversation. And finally your action item was the video or book. :-)

What exactly was on the cards?

Jack Harich
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Postby Jack Harich » Wed Sep 19, 2007 5:34 pm

Regarding your:
Very interesting.

So your leader was the card plus "what do you think of this?". Your vision development was the subsequent conversation. And finally your action item was the video or book. :-)


Wow. Never thought of it like that. Thanks.


What exactly was on the cards?


See this page. Now you can print your own! I printed 50 on card stock, light blue and yellow. But this was a fairly unique event. The cards worked there, but a custom approach is needed for most political rallies, they are so different I suspect.

Jack


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